Monday, August 13, 2018

Green Ash Chair Course

Expert Peter Young runs teaches valuable skills at Corehead Cabin

The green ash chair course run at Corehead Cabin has been a huge success! The week long course run by expert Peter Young has concluded with the completion of everyones green ash chairs. Everyone involved has had a fantastic time on this informative experience and more Ash Chair courses will be planned for the future.

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Posted by James on 13/08 at 11:17 AM
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Friday, July 20, 2018

Corehead Cabin

Treesurv's latest project, a timber cabin reminsicent of the Canadian Frontier

Collaberating alongside Cabin Builder Doug Roper, Treesurv has recently finished a Log Cabin for Borders Forest Trust at Corehead Farm. The walls of the Cabin were created using larch stems sourced from the farm.

Posted by James on 20/07 at 10:03 AM
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Friday, October 13, 2017

Native planting Work for the National Trust for Scotland

Working away from home in the beautiful area around Loch Tay.

This autumn, the team has been given the opportunity to work with the National Trust for Scotland at Ben Lawers Nature Reserve planting Downy Willow. The project offers some gorgeous views and has allowed us to use our experience with Montane planting to create new habitat on an incredible site. The Treesurv team also had the opportunity to visit the Fortingall Yew, which has been dated at over a 1000 years old and is reckoned by some to be 5-6000 years old and possibly the oldest tree in Britain!

Posted by James on 13/10 at 01:52 PM
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Monday, July 10, 2017

The beginning of Gameshope

Work begins on our latest project.

The team has started preparation for planting on the slopes of Gameshope, this project sets out to plant 80,000 trees up the valley. This site has provided some challenges like accurately setting out compartments on a steep incline and transporting personel and materials across a fast flowing body of water. Whilst posing some difficulties, the project has required us to learn and identify particular species like the Cuckoo Flower or the Orange Tipped Butterfly in order to protect and preserve their habitat whilst planting. We are all very positive about this site and look forward to the start of planting in the autumn.

Posted by James on 10/07 at 04:27 PM
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Wednesday, March 01, 2017

March maintenance

Using a quiet day to restore our tractor...

We have are currently carrying out repairs on our venerable Fordson Super Dexta. This small but mighty machine may have rolled off the line in 1962 but it is still used today to split logs and transport materials. The engine is still in great shape but we are currently replacing the rubber hoses as they have become brittle and have started to crack and leak. At Treesurv we seize the chance to learn and so have taken to replacing the hoses ourselves in order to better understand this machine and further our knowledge. 

Posted by James on 01/03 at 04:13 PM
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Tuesday, January 03, 2017

Helmend

A new project for a new year.

We have brought in 2017 with a new project: planting woodland just outside of Broughton on the slopes above Helmend. This has included a visit to the Nursery and helping an eager Duke of Edinburgh student complete her volunteering work by providing materials and space for her to complete her own project.

 

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Posted by James on 03/01 at 12:01 PM
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Wednesday, September 14, 2016

The acorn gatherers

 Wonderful day out in the depths of Galloway's ancient oak woodland!

Recently we have been assisting with growing acorns that have fallen from sessile oaks found in the Glen Trool forest park. This is part of a larger effort to grow around 600 000 trees to help restore ancient woodland within Galloway. For more information, read the BBC article on the project here.

 

Posted by James on 14/09 at 10:41 AM
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Saturday, April 04, 2015

Milestone number of trees planted

Talla Bank, the day we planted past the 100,000 mark

It has been a challenging planting season so far and the team have endured some horrendous weather conditions along the way. The first trees went in the ground at Talla Bank on the 5th November and yesterday we planted our way past the 100,000 mark- a huge thanks to all the team.

 

Posted by James on 04/04 at 01:37 PM
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Sunday, November 30, 2014

Talla tunes

Live lunchtime music session

Somewhere up on the hill in the mist there where a group of tree planters listening to live music- wonder when or for that matter if there has ever been someone playing an instrument on the high slopes above Talla before?

Posted by James on 30/11 at 10:43 PM
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Tuesday, October 07, 2014

On a new frontier

Something a bit different!

50 mature Larch infected with phytophthora ramorum converted in to a frontier style cabin. Built over 4 weeks during the summer this was a project that caught the imagination of all that were involved. The build team camping on site and living a lifestyle, minus chainsaws, that would not have been unrecognisable to someone living on the American frontier 200 hundred years ago.

  

Posted by James on 07/10 at 09:17 PM
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Talla Bank

Our next planting project

Since the start of August we have be working on our next planting project. The site is on the hill above Talla reservoir and the task- plant 160000 native trees, a bit of a challange and not for the faint hearted. The slopes are about as extreme as you can get for this sort of work, the views on your way to the top make the walk from the lower slopes worth it.

 

Posted by James on 07/10 at 08:51 PM
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Friday, February 07, 2014

Treesurv at the North Gasherbrum Glacier

K2 Base Camp & Gasherbrum Base Camp 2013

September 2013- Paul was on a 38 day expedition to the Gasherbrum Glacier where this picture was taken and then on to the K2 Base camp, the same camp used as Younghusband in 1887 and then Shipton in 1937.

Posted by James on 07/02 at 04:55 PM
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Work in Progress

Native planting used to screen new development.

Our latest planting project is a great opportunity to establish some pockets of native woodland with all the benifits that that brings and at the same time be utilised to screen a new farm development.

We have however intermixed a few Norway Spruce into this planting scheme to act as a nurse to help the main body of the planting establish. The Norway Spruce can then be removed once the other trees are large enough, this will allow more room for the remaining trees and create some 'natural' clearings.

 

This planting season has so far been a lot easier than last year; At this time last year we were having to make a daily expedition in the Argo to Lochanburn (Corehead). This year however so far we have been working on lower ground where we have the luxury of being able to park the vehicles right next to the planting areas. A recent trip to Lochanburn has revealed that the Bothy did not survive the gales before Christmas, the winds at that altitude on exposed ground must have been well in excess of 100 mph. A rebuild seems like a good excuse for a weekends camping in native woodland during the warmer weather!

Posted by James on 07/02 at 04:18 PM
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Wednesday, February 05, 2014

Beech infected with Meripilus Giganteus

Giant Polypore, Meripilus giganteus

Aswell as structural damage (loss of co-leader) some years ago this Beech tree had been infected by Giant Polypore, Meripilus giganteus.

This parasitic fungi can cause extensive internal damage before any external evidence of presence can be seen. It infects and grows on the roots and the trunk base of the host broadleaf, particularly Beech. Infection occurs via wounded or damaged tissue, the fungi establishes on deadwood before attacking the tree's living tissue. The first evidence of infection can be crown dieback or defoliation (as in this case). Bracket like fruiting bodies are produced in late summer or autumn at the base of the stem or from the ground immediately above any infected roots. 

With this tree an infection had been confirmed by the presence of fruiting bodies late last summer and felling was considered a requirement as the tree is located in a public access area and as decay progresses the tree weakens and the root anchorage fails. 

Stem girth at 1.5m was 4.52m

Posted by James on 05/02 at 02:24 PM
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Sunday, January 26, 2014

Colours early in the year

Signs that Spring is just around the corner

We have had a busy time both before and after the Christmas holidays tidying up the damage caused by the strong winds and the work is still continuing. This time of year is always a bit difficult with the short hours of daylight and the inevitable poor weather. But through last week we came across these Snowdrops, a sure sign that spring is just around the corner; longer daylight hours and maybe some warmth. 

We have also seen  Witch-Hazel (Hamamelis) flowering over the last week, a good shrub to have in the garden for a splash of colour on a dreary day. On that note I also have to mention Flowering Currant (Ribes sanguineum) with its bright pink flowers. Flowering as the leaves emerge the colours announce the arrival of early spring.

Posted by James on 26/01 at 10:01 PM
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